Return of the Snooper’s Charter

Mathew Sayer In the News

The draft Investigatory Powers Bill (DRIP) is the latest bid to legitimize surveillance in the UK post-Snowden. A previous version of the bill failed in 2013 when the Liberal Democrats, a minority coalition partner at the time, vetoed it. That act of valor could not save the Lib Dems, and they lost 93% of their MPs in the 2015 General Election. In that election, the Conservatives won a shaky majority, formed a government, harvested the organs of the Draft Communications Data Bill, stuck that in the Queen’s Speech and now …

The Geopolitics of Networks

Helasvuo From our Perspective

In the history of the world, various things and phenomena, once they gain some relevance to multiple parties, they tend to end up as targets of politics of power. The question “Who Governs” becomes suddenly relevant and might even surpass any financial, ethical or practical preferences. Thus, it also happened that the networks, indeed the autonomous and rather chaotic IP networks became victims of geopolitical demands as legacy nations became to express their authority either inside of some specific range of networks or reaching out for global coverage. By definition …

C-51, Canada’s Own Excessive Anti-Terrorism Bill

Michael Policy

Canada has upped the ante on their anti-terrorism program. This month the anti-terror bill C-51 was passed through parliament and given royal assent. It was introduced as a conservative bill but gained liberal support as well from the New Democratic Party- although they called for amendments to the bill. C-51, officially known as the Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act, will make ISPs and search engines store e-, telephone and internet communications in order to disclose this information to governments, no warrant necessary. What is Canada’s C-51 Anti-Terrorism Bill About, …

Censorship Reaches a New Height in Australia

Michael Policy

Australia, this week, was able to pass internet restrictions that not even the UK or the US has been able to enact. No, no, This bill is along the s of censorship-rich countries like Turkey, Syria, Russia, Singapore, and China. This came in the form of a bill known as the Copyright Amendment Act 2015. This bill is aimed at protecting the owners of copyrights. It was passed as an attempt to curtail the distribution of movies, shows, music, and other forms of entertainment from being passed around on …